Coming Out: An Act of Contrition

I own a sincere apology to everyone who has ever seen me on my knees in a “house of God”…

… to everyone who has ever seen me taking communion, serving as an altar boy, reciting the Lord’s Prayer, entering a confessional, making the sign of the cross, singing in the choir, putting money in the collection basket, saying grace before dinner, calling a priest father, and reciting the pledge of allegiance.

I renounce ALL of it.

I feel embarrassed for my ignorance, blind obedience, and conformity… for having fallen for, and having perpetuated, the scam.

I feel especially deep remorse for my complicity… no matter how innocent it may have been… which granted my tacit endorsement of the whole poisonous enterprise.

For all the above and more, I am deeply sorry.

Please forgive me.

Learn more… Coming Out: Gaslighting

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20 thoughts on “Coming Out: An Act of Contrition

  1. If I harmed anyone I would apologize, provided that I was also seriously contrite. I have injured others intentionally and I seldom suffer regrets when my actions were, in my opinion, unfortunately necessary. For being wrong or making harmless mistakes I regret my error. But I offer no apology because no harm was done or intended.
    I say, if (when) someone embraces atheism, “you needn’t confess anything or attend meetings or services…You don’t have to give anyone money or ask for forgiveness.” Saying you’re sorry for correctly practicing the religion you were raised in gives the wrong impression of coming out.
    When I returned to the RC Church after a long absence, I did so through the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Years later, when someone asked me if I was atheist, I simply said, “Yes.”
    I do confess my arrogance about this, but I require no forgiveness of myself or anyone else. I am not sorry that I was born into, grew up in, or spent 12 years as a leader in a Roman Catholic Parish. I learned so much there.
    You did nothing as a BC requiring you to make amends. Based on other things you’ve said, much of that contributes to the man of character you are today.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Bill. Between us girls, while the apology was sincere, I feel zero guilt and zero shame… now that I am “out”. But I must confess that my apology was intentionally a bit over the top for maximum effect… and a wee bit of facetious irony (not sure if that is the right choice of words) in the sense that the clergy and even the congregation would have ME apologize to THEM for my blasphemy and apostasy. ; ) I am not expecting any apologies from any of them, of course.

      Liked by 1 person

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